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Seminar: Understanding China

Speakers include Zheng Bijian, Felippe Gonzales, Huang Ping, He Jiahong & Martin Jacques

Organised by China Institute for Innovation & Development Strategy (CIIDS) and Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council

Corinthia Hotel, London SW1 2BD, UK

By invitation only

The following is an English translation of an article by Martin Jacques that appeared in People’s Daily, 9th January 2018

The 19th Chinese Communist Party Congress marked a new moment in China’s arrival on the global stage. Congresses of the Chinese Communist Party, even in the modern era, have invariably attracted little attention in the West. They have been regarded as neither particularly relevant nor important, rubber-stamp occasions that were difficult to understand or decipher and best left to the China experts. The 19th Congress broke the mould. It was widely reported and recognised in the West as an event of major global importance. Instead of treating the Congress as a somewhat bizarre tribal occasion, some of the coverage displayed a greater sense of seriousness and inquiry. It was widely acknowledged that this was one of the most important political events of 2017. The coverage was further evidence that China has moved to the centre of the global stage. 

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The following is an English translation of an article by Martin Jacques that appeared in the People’s Daily, 22nd December 2017.

At the end of 2017 uncertainty dominates the outlook for the future. As we can now see with great clarity, the Western financial crisis of 2007-8 proved the most important turning point in the West since 1945. For a decade, the Western economies have been mired in varying degrees of stagnation, not least with regard to living standards. And it was the Great Recession that begat the Great Populist Uprising in 2016. The latter signalled the end of the hegemony of neo-liberalism in the West, which began in 1980 with the arrival of Reagan and Thatcher and was characterised by hyper-globalisation, privatisation and a huge growth in inequality. The Uprising was driven by large swathes of the population in both the United States and Britain whose living standards had more or less stagnated for four decades. It was a popular revolt against the governing elites by those who felt left behind and who held these elites responsible for their deteriorating situation. Politically the new mood was articulated most clearly, though not solely, by the right, notably Trump in America and the Brexiteers in the UK. 

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31/12/17, CGTN

Part 1: How does China’s global outlook differ from the West’s?

‘The idea of a common future, or a sense of shared destiny, has become a very powerful theme of Chinese foreign policy’

In Part 1 of Martin Jacques on China (presented by CGTN)Martin Jacques explains China’s growing influence on the world stage, and considers why its global outlook is so different to that of Western countries. Read more >

Talk at the China Institute

Title: ‘Antonio Gramsci’

2pm

Fudan University, Shanghai, China.

 

 

The United States and China wrapped up two days of high level economic talks without any agreement. The two sides said they had what they described as a frank exchange, but failed to agree on major bilateral trade and economic issues. Martin Jacques provides gives his views in an interview for the international news broadcaster TRT World.

YouGov-Cambridge Seminar on ‘Trump, Putin and Russia-West relations’ with Lord Richards of Herstmonceux, Dr Asye Zarakol, Daniel Hannan and Marcus Roberts.

3pm, 26th June 2017

London

Private event.

China’s biggest single investment so far under the Belt & Road Initiative (BRI) is the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC).

Click to expand.

 

The next infographics are also taken from a Financial Times article: “China’s Belt and Road Initiative” by Gabriel Wildau and Nan Ma. 

Click to expand.

All eyes are on China’s two sessions, seeking clues about the future

Editor’s note: Each year in early March, China’s top legislature and political advisory body convene in Beijing for their annual meetings known as the two sessions. China Daily will present the highlights of the meetings, which run from March 3 to 15.

China’s big annual two sessions political meeting could be one of the most important in recent years, given the uncertain international backdrop, according to experts.

Some 5,000 participants from the National People’s Congress, China’s top legislature, and the National Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC), the country’s top political advisory body, will descend on Beijing for the event.

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